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Recruiting Horsepullers
    It seems like we have a lot more deaths in at least my area than we have new pullers? Are others experiencing the same, and does anyone have any ideas for making the sport enticing to newcomers?

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whitey smith
Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 08:29 AM
One way to get more horse pullers would be not to have some pullers show up with 3 pair in each class. with horses that cost on averege $25.000 each or more. it is very hard to compete with all that money

uno
Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 02:26 PM
[q]On Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 08:29 AM horspuller57 wrote:
One way to get more horse pullers would be not to have some pullers show up with 3 pair in each class. with horses that cost on averege $25.000 each or more. it is very hard to compete with all that money[]unfortuntely you and me will never see that day, but you have definately spoken the truth here. In the 70's and 80's nobody enjoyed horse pulling as much as me and my dad and yes, we could hold our own. Every horse pull we went to we felt that we had a chance at the top spot...and a puller has to know that he has a chance. But today, it is a guarantee that he does not have a chance for any of the top 3 positions unless he is the one with the money backing. And again, a man has to know he has a chance. We lived and breathed horse pulling, but in the 90's it became a sport of who had the most money to buy those high priced horses and drugs. There is no longer a sport of "horse pulling" and that to me is extremely sad!

John
Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 09:14 PM
why don't you get off the computer and go work your horses and maybe you can be in the top three you whine ass.

Ryan
Thursday, June 10, 2010 at 04:41 PM
Talking about the money, it is kind of like college basketball. Butler can make it to the final four, but it is going to take them a few years to develop the talent once that group leaves, whereas Kentucky and Duke recruit the top athletes year after year. We without money can't replace a good horse immediately, and usually can't find two ready to compete at the top level at the same time. It takes a few years to develop prospects into top horses, and a while to rebuild if one goes down. As far as the drugs, they are called "performance-enhancing" drugs for a reason, and without testing, it is difficult to compete. But I operate under the idea that it may be more difficult to compete with the high priced horses, but it is just going to take me longer to get a pair to that level, and be satisfied at making progress. But the question is: what can we do about it? How do we make it better? I am 32 years old and want this passion of mine to be a lifelong one, not something that is going to die when I am still wanting to and capable of doing it.

Curtis
Friday, June 11, 2010 at 10:12 AM
one way to get more horses to the pulls is to make champions out of the top pullers where they pull aginst each other and make another class where lesser horses pull aginst each other. I think fuel prices is what hurting the sport.----Curtis

John
Friday, June 11, 2010 at 02:44 PM
Chuck couldn't of said it any better!

digger
Friday, June 11, 2010 at 03:46 PM
It is too bad that people can't express an opinion regarding a legitimate concern without being belittled by others. Just something for you to ponder. Isn't it interesting that farm or barefoot pulling is becoming more popular all the time as the numbers in the "professional" pulls continue to decline.

digger
Saturday, June 12, 2010 at 07:52 PM
Chuck, not sure where you are from either but I can't see where you can say horsepulling is doing as well now as it was even 5-10 years ago. Long time pulls have disapeered, fairs are paying fewer and less premiums and what about entry numbers? You used to be able to point to the big pulls in the country and know before you left the yard that there would be 20-30 teams in a class. Where can you go now where you will see that many entries? I'm not saying I prefer a barnyard pull. I most definitely do not but I'm also not blind to the issues facing horsepulling today. No doubt it's a topic that should be given more thought.

Ryan
Saturday, June 12, 2010 at 11:55 PM
I am not complaining about competition. I see what Chris Hatfield and the Brown Brothers, among others, have done on this website, and have been up against Chris once with a pair I had won a lot of pulls with, finishing two rounds off (although they were "tennis ball in the tuna can" pulls and that rule has thankfully been voted out) and like I said before, I want to get at least close to that level. Every time someone comes along and raises the bar, others eventually take the challenge and figure out what it takes to compete. That is not the issue that I am talking about. The issue as I see it is how few new names are on the list of winners, and a lot more expressions of condolences to those who have gone. I would love to pass this love of mine to my kids, as it was passed to me by my dad and grandpa, but my oldest is 7, and I am having a hard time seeing especially the smaller organizations staying alive long enough. I am a teacher, and I can't imagine most of the kids I deal with, even the ones I think are really good kids, being willing to spend the time and effort it takes to learn this sport. It really isn't something you can just pick up from scratch, you need to understand horses, and then spend time learning all the details. I was really hoping someone had some kind of idea of a successful pattern for drawing in others, something that has worked for them. If not, I think it is a responsibility of all of us involved to do our best to draw not just more pulls and spectators, but more competitors into the sport. This website does a spectacular service to our sport and its promotion, but we need to get more active in drawing interested people in and helping them get started in the competitive end of things.

whitey smith
Tuesday, June 15, 2010 at 03:09 PM
I did not see anyone dishing Chris or any one else. I look at the results most every day have seen the teams in each class drop.

June Bug
Tuesday, June 15, 2010 at 03:52 PM
I'm fairly new to the sport (actually competeing, 3-4 years), I have learned there are dues to be paid. The dues could be buying the right type of horse, figuring out the exercise program that fit the horses and your schedule. some where in there you have to properly adjust collars, hames and the rest of the harness. When you are learning, these issues are big and if not tended too could defeat you before you enter the pulling ring. All this is time comsuming,( and very expensive) this I believe is at the heart of the reason this sport is not catching on with people outside of the pulling families. As for the big money horses, if I had the money I would buy them, I don't. I like to pull with the big money people once in awhile, I usually ask them question to help my horses, ie my whole program. I have learned a lot pulling with these guys,it takes a lot of time before they let you in, keep pulling and they help you. I do not hold anything against them. Pulling with them you will learn how to compete. I do enjoy going to pulls where the Big Money people do not go, I do not always win, but I feel i can compete with the horse in the ring. I talk to young guys who have had horses in the past, They tell me it's not the competition that they gave the sport up for now, it was the cost and all the (hours and family)time required to be competitive. With this economy i believe things are not going to get any cheaper. I feel Blessed to pull horses no matter where and who I pull against. I personally got into the sport to be able to drive a team of horses in competition, any competition.

Ryan
Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 09:28 PM
I think June Bug refers to several real and pressing problems, but while we can't control what the economy does, and that does affect the number of horsepullers, it is the dues that must be paid that we already in the sport can help with. If each concerned horse puller would seek out at least one interested person, and take the time to help that person get started, to spread the sport beyond just family for the good of the sport, it would help immensely. If we intend to preserve the sport, we have to infuse it with some new blood from the bottom up. I am really sorry that I have engaged in the discussion about the difficulty of competing, as it really isn't the point I want to make. Each pull needs a last place team just as much as a first place team. There can only be one of each. For the good of the sport, we need more of all types, those who are in it to be the best and those who enjoy the camaraderie among pullers and the spiritual satisfaction of working with these animals. There is a puller in our association who has been at it for close to 30 years. He won his first contest last year, and found himself back at the middle to bottom for the rest of the year. But he religiously goes to twice as many pulls as I do, supporting the sport even at the cost of the success of his horses. He truly loves doing it, not the winning, but the process, the thrill of working with the horses and doing it in front of a crowd. We could all use a little more of that in us and in our associations.

GG
Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 09:13 PM
Concerning the $ pullers, we've got a $700 and $1500 horse that are now beating some of the top Maryland and Virginia horse pullers. We love it when they get beat and go out and buy more big $ horses. It's putting money into the economy. LoL......



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